Search

a southern yankee abroad

Category

wildlife

Elephant Jungle Sanctuary

This afternoon, I hopped in the back of a pickup truck with a few other friends from my hostel and rode 1.5 hours through the hills outside of Chiang Mai to visit the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary. The sanctuary is a camp for elephants who were formerly used in the riding business. Many people aren’t aware that riding elephants actually hurts the elephants over time, as their bodies are structured to carry weight in their lower bodies and not on top. Elephants are also harmed by the equipment used in the riding business, such as straps and hooks. The average lifespan of an elephant used for riding is about 20 years shorter than other elephants.

IMG_7369

The sanctuary, as well as camps and parks with a similar focus, is harnessing the tourism industry to change the way elephants are perceived and treated. Elephants were once used by their owners in the logging industry. When that industry dwindled, elephants were then transitioned into the tourism industry as a riding attraction. The elephants are owned by “mahouts,” or elephant trainers, who train the elephants to do tricks and to be ridden and then lease the elephants to tourism companies. By introducing a sanctuary experience as an “ethical alternative” that consistently attracts consumers, the sanctuary pitches itself to the mahouts as a better (the mahouts don’t want the elephants to suffer either, but they have to find ways to cash in on their investment), more lucrative, and more promising business choice for their lease. The sanctuary then attracts tourists to come and feed, bathe, pet, and rinse the elephants, and uses the money made to pay the mahouts as well as operational costs. Mahouts make money, the elephants are treated well, and tourists can take part in a fun experience.  The sanctuary will also buy riding elephants with its own funds, and these elephants become permanent residents of the camp. All other elephants are on lease from their mahouts.

 
So what did we do with the elephants? First, we had to put on a traditional Karen tribal tunic. The guides told us this is so the elephants would feel comfortable around us (maybe this is true, or maybe it’s something they just tell tourists…who knows!) IMG_7476.JPGThen, we started feeding the elephants bananas. Elephants eat between 200 and 300 kilograms of food per day! The elephants were not shy at all, and actually followed us when they saw we had bananas in our hands! One elephant even almost mistook my iPhone in my hand as a banana…crisis averted! These elephants were very muddy, and it didn’t take long before I was very muddy.

IMG_7374
The elephants are so excited to get bananas from visitors!!

This was very fitting, as we next took the elephants to a mud pool and got in the pool with them to give a mud bath. Yes, I swam in the mud with the elephants! I have never been dirtier in my life, and it was fabulous! My biggest concern was being careful that the elephants didn’t accidentally step on me or one of my friends. We were a few hours from any town, so this would be a bad place to break a foot! After the mud bath, we followed the elephants down to a river and rinsed and scrubbed them. Then, we left the elephants behind and trekked to a beautiful waterfall in the jungle and went for a swim. By this point, I was covered in mud from head to toe, so I took the chance to rinse off in the surprisingly cold water. Afterward, we all had a delicious meal prepared by the camp workers, and then hopped on the back of the pickup to go the 1.5 hours back to Chiang Mai. Given the winding and bumpy road and exhaust fumes from the truck, we were all a little nauseated, but that was a small price to pay for such a beautiful and magical day!

IMG_7409
This elephant is pregnant and you could feel the baby elephant kicking!! Her baby will get to live at the sanctuary with her 🙂

13165998_10207521139719141_5070906824419358327_nIMG_7385.JPG

Everything’s Bigger (and Weirder) in Texas: 48 Hours in Austin

Last weekend, a good friend of mine got married in Austin, which meant I finally had a good reason to visit this amazing city! Given what I already knew about Austin, I had a feeling I would love this place, and this prediction absolutely proved to be true. What was supposed to be 72 hours in Austin actually turned out to be 48 hours (I may have slept through my alarm and missed my flight)…oops! Fortunately, United was very accommodating and understanding, and helped me re-book for the very next morning for a small fee (thanks United!). Once I arrived in Austin, the rest of the weekend could not have been more fun. Below is a breakdown of how I spent my weekend in Austin.

Day 1

Lunch at Torchy’s Tacos

This place is an Austin establishment (so I’m told). After settling into my Airbnb on arrival, my friend/native Texan tour guide Chris introduced me to this delicious food truck in South Austin off 1st Street. All of the tacos were reasonably priced and huge (especially compared to the tacos you get in NYC…I guess this is what they mean when they say everything is bigger here!) I ordered the Green Chile Pork and the Independent taco (as in real life, the Democrat was too expensive and the Republican was made up of sketchy ingredients, so I went with the Independent).

 

Visit the TX State Capitol

The State Capitol building and grounds are free and open to the public. A fun place to explore and get your history fix!

13047851_10207378301508275_378596608666674979_o

Hang Out on Rainey Street

Rainey Street features a row of laid-back, bungalow-style bars with a large variety of local brews on tap. We found ourselves at Bangers, which featured a beer garden-style outdoor seating area complete with cornhole games. Food trucks are conveniently scattered throughout the street!

13102760_10207403836986646_4848906885908886196_n
This is why I love Austin…!

Dinner at Lambert’s BBQ

Another Austin establishment, so I’m told. I was still full from my Torchy’s but I did try some of Beth’s brisket and the mac and cheese, which was made with Tabasco and goat cheese. It definitely ranks as one of the top 3 best mac and cheese dishes I’ve ever tried…I highly recommend!  

IMG_6992

Watch the Bats

Strangely enough, hundreds of thousands of bats fly out from under the Congress Avenue Bridge in Austin each night at dusk to attend to their nightly feeding. We were advised to arrive about 30 minutes before sunset to watch this happen. We posted up on the bridge at around 7:30, and hundreds of people had already staked out their viewing spot. Hundreds more people joined us before the bats finally flew out around 8:30pm. The sight was truly eerie to watch–to me, it looked like someone turned on a water spigot and bats instead of water started pouring out from an opening in a bridge. A cloud of bats could also be seen flying miles away down the river. This is truly one of the main things that makes Austin “weird”!

IMG_7004
It’s impossible to tell, but those specks of light in the lower left corner are little tiny bats.

Visit Sixth Street

Sixth Street is the center of the nightlife in Austin, and it has your standard mix of live music venues and college-type bars. This street reminds me a lot of Broadway in Nashville… it’s a good time and worth stopping by!

Day 2

Rent Bikes and Ride Along the Colorado River

The Colorado River is absolutely beautiful, and the trail along the south end of the river offers beautiful views of the city. Beth and I rented bikes from Barton Springs Bike Rentals and took off for a three hour self-guided ride along the river and through South Austin!  

13063449_10207385415406118_4280113328735196637_o

Lunch at Torchy’s Tacos (again…I know!)

As Beth had not tried Torchy’s yet, I broke down and ate lunch here a second day in a row (just kidding…I willingly ate here again! I loved this place from the first minute!) This time, I ordered the Baja Shrimp and the Trailer Park (non-trashy style…meaning without queso!)

IMG_7028

Enjoy the Murals and Artwork

Our bike ride and walking the day before took us past a lot of great murals and artwork unique to Austin.

13043805_10207403835586611_115586320618611070_n

Grab a juice at Juiceland.

Located next to the bike rental shop, this quirky little spot provided the perfect post-biking refreshment. I got the “Gingerade,” which is like a spicy fresh squeezed lemonade drink with cayenne pepper. I was very excited to learn they’ve opened their first location outside of TX in Brooklyn, so I am looking forward to visiting them there!

IMG_7052

Visit The Driskill

My friend’s wedding reception was at The Driskill, but it is definitely worth visiting in its own right. This place is iconic Texas! While the reception was fantastic, I can only imagine the food and cocktails normally served at the restaurant and bar in the Driskill are just as good. The Driskill is also located on Sixth Street, so it’s very easy to go out nearby!

IMG_7016

IMG_7056

I loved Austin’s vibe. It is not surprising to me that 100 people are moving there each day! Hopefully, the city can maintain its “small-town” charm and quirkiness and low cost of living despite these changes. I know, at least last weekend, the sun seems to shine a little brighter in Austin!

IMG_7034

 

 

Change the Game: The Economics of Saving the Rhino

774771_10206454467573004_507904685384708857_o

If there is such thing as a modern day dinosaur, the rhino comes close. It was like stepping back in time, as I watched these majestically ancient creatures move purposefully under the shade provided by the trees’ small branches. I found myself in awe of their presence. I tried not to breathe very loudly, as the rhino fixed his beady eye on me. If he wanted, the rhino could have plowed through the shade trees, easily uprooting them, before making his way to and through myself and my fellow travelers crouched low in the grass just a few yards away. However, the peaceful and friendly nature of these rhinos put me at ease, and I knew they were content to have me in their backyard, so long as I didn’t make too much noise! I fell in love with these easygoing creatures.

The issue is we are losing these animals.

One of the most magical but least expected highlights of my trip to Africa in December was the day I spent tracking the white rhinoceros near the Matopos with Ian Harmer of African Wanderer Safaris. I have always considered myself to have a respectable level of concern regarding animal and wildlife issues. However, spending a day with the rhinos of Zimbabwe made me passionate about the fight to save the rhino from extinction. I was stunned by what I learned—it is estimated two rhinos are killed each day, and poaching has grown considerably in the last 10 years. In 2007, 13 rhinos were poached in South Africa. In 2015, 1,215 rhinos were poached. At this rate, there will be no more rhinos left in the world within the next 10 years, in the wild or in captivity.

10258630_10206454489293547_4819116794748607864_o
Snack time!

 

Why are the rhinos dying?

Rhinos across southern Africa are the target of organized poaching schemes driven by the economic forces of the illegal horn trade across Asia. Some Asian cultures believe rhino horn holds special medical power (everything from boosting male virility to curing cancer). The rhino horn can be worth up to twice its weight in gold in these markets. Poachers have advanced systems involving helicopters and infrared technology to track and kill the rhinos, often in the most inhumane ways possible. Ian shared a heartbreaking story from several months back about finding a rhino he had “grown up with” left for dead on the side of the road after the poachers had cut his face off to take his horn. In an effort to protect the rhinos in the fight against the poachers, rangers at the Matobo National Park carry machine guns and are mandated to shoot and kill suspected poachers on the spot.

887215_10206454470013065_8744417294000162514_o
With an armed guard in the park

Perhaps the biggest tragedy of all is that rhinos do not have to die or suffer to give up their horns. In fact, cutting a rhino horn is similar to clipping a human’s fingernails or toenails—if done correctly, the process is easy and pain-free. The staff at the Matobo National Park regularly cuts the horns of the rhinos in their park, in order to make them less of a target for poachers. This is unlike the elephant’s tusk, which is essentially a tooth instead of a fingernail. Elephants must be killed to extract the tusk.

How can we save the rhino?

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) has been instrumental in working to protect the rhino and eliminate illegal horn trading. CITES meets every three years and has a standing committee specifically focused on the rhino. Recently, CITES has pushed for the government of Vietnam to conduct “consumer behavior research” in an effort to develop strategies to decrease demand for rhino horn, as well as to impose stiffer penalties for those participating in the illegal market.  CITES has also mandated Mozambique, South Africa, and Zimbabwe to continue their efforts to coordinate along their borders to stop poachers, as well as to implement penalties for poachers more consistently. For example, in 2013, Mozambique issued a higher number of poaching fines than ever before, yet only 3% were paid.

The challenge is finding a solution that will prevent the rhinoceros from becoming extinct. It is quite difficult to change mindsets and alter economic pressures over a given period of time, and even more so when the time is severely limited given the rate that rhinos are being poached. What if the trade of the rhino horn became legal? Until 2009, domestic trading of rhino horn was legal in South Africa. It was made illegal in 2009 as a response to the spike in poaching. What about international trade of rhino horn? CITES banned this in 1977, in an effort to protect already dwindling rhino numbers. Despite these bans, the poaching issue has become considerably worse over the last decade, and we are now facing the possible extinction of the rhino.

Since it is painless to cut the horns of rhinos (or “dehorn” them), rhinos could be farmed like cattle and dehorned regularly, thus better protecting them from poachers and generating a profit for the farmers and benefitting the local economy. Also, poachers will be de-incentivized, as a legalized trade would increase supply and lower prices. However, there is always the risk that legalizing the trade could have the opposite effect of increasing demand, in which case poachers would still have inducement to poach. Also, given the demand for rhino horn is primarily in Asia, a ban on domestic trade of rhino horn is a non-issue, as there is really no domestic market. It seems a lift on the international trade ban would be the key driver of this solution.

CITES will have their triennial meeting this September in Johannesburg, South Africa. Without doubt, there will be continued debate on what policies would be most effective for protecting the rhino. I hope the leaders at CITES realize the current strategies have been ineffective, and time is running out for the rhino unless we change the game.

10014987_10206454464732933_1399175186600744853_o

886985_10206454490453576_5362853284056452594_o

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: